Available Google +1's for Purchase in Bulk, Denominations Starts '50, 250, 2000'

According to a report, a web site that goes with the name Plussem.com, and is an arm of SEOShop.com, is offering Google's +1s at the rate of 50 for $10, 250 for $30, or 2,000 for $170.The company says, "Buying Plus Ones can help your site out by showing Google that the content featured on […]

According to a report, a web site that goes with the name Plussem.com, and is an arm of SEOShop.com, is offering Google's +1s at the rate of 50 for $10, 250 for $30, or 2,000 for $170.

The company says, "Buying Plus Ones can help your site out by showing Google that the content featured on it or the page being is of value to real people and not spammy." In terms of making the +1s seem the most authentic, here's what they promise:

    • All +1's come from people with a Google account that has been verified by phone (Phone Verified Accounts)
    • All +1's come from real people. No bots are being used!
    • All +1's are being given by manually going to your website and clicking the +1 button
    • It's untraceable because the +1's are being given from different IP's
    • All +1's are given dripped over a couple of days so it looks natural

This's a just the direct violation of Google's quality guidelines:

Avoid tricks intended to improve search engine rankings. A good rule of thumb is whether you'd feel comfortable explaining what you've done to a website that competes with you. Another useful test is to ask, "Does this help my users? Would I do this if search engines didn't exist?"

On the flip side of the coin, "It's a nice, market-based redistribution of money. Instead of paying a few high-priced advertising firms to drive sales, you pay a ton of very poor people with Internet access in developing countries a tiny slice of the money you would have spent on traditional marketing before."

Of course this isn't the only site out there with promises of gaming social platforms. With some simple web searches, anyone can find a variety of packages that offer similar services. This is also fairly regular on other popular sites like Digg, Facebook and Twitter.

[Via: The Atlantic]