Google's VP Responds to Google+ 'Real Name' Rules; Says Working on Better Ways to Communicate Issues to Users

Google has been banning Google+ accounts without warning, since last week over "real name" rule.Howerve, there's a help article in the Google+ help section that clearly defines what can and can't be used as your profile name. But the policy is pretty narrow as to what your name is allowed to be, and it's obviously […]

Google has been banning Google+ accounts without warning, since last week over "real name" rule.

Howerve, there's a help article in the Google+ help section that clearly defines what can and can't be used as your profile name. But the policy is pretty narrow as to what your name is allowed to be, and it's obviously trying to force Google+ profiles to represent one real person, and not a nickname, pseudonym or group. If your account is in violation of these terms, it will be suspended. If the account is deemed to be violating the Google Terms of Service (and there hasn't been a clear explanation of how the overall Google TOS applies to Google+ plus, and which content on your page you are responsible for), you could be banned from all Google services.

Google's VP, Vic Gundotra, has spoken to Robert Scoble about the problem, and while he doesn't deny the problems they're creating, he doesn't seem too worried about it.

He says he is making some tough choices and that he will be judged over time how those choices turn out.

He says that he is trying to make sure a positive tone gets set here.

He claims that the naming rules are there for a reason and are meant to be positive, "like when a restaurant doesn't allow people who aren't wearing shirts to enter."

Here's a quote from Scoble's Google+ page:

He says, instead, it is about having common names and removing people who spell their names in weird ways, like using upside-down characters, or who are using obviously fake names, like "god" or worse.

He says they have made some mistakes while doing the first pass at this and they are learning. He also says the team will change how they communicate with people. IE, let them know what they are doing wrong, etc.

He also says they are working on ways to handle pseudonyms, but that will be a while before the team can turn on those features (everyone is working hard on a raft of different things and can't just react overnight to community needs).

While the rules themselves may not change, Gundotra promised that Google is working on better ways to communicate these kinds of issues to the users. That may be a consolation to those who believe their accounts were suspended unjustly, but Google seems pretty set on keeping it real, so to speak.

[Source: Google+]