Google Scholar Citations Launches, Helps You Compute & Trach Citation Metrics

Citation metrics are often used to gauge the influence of scholarly articles and authors. Google Schoolar blog today announced the "Google Scholar Citations," a simple way to compute citation metrics and track them over time."We use a statistical model based on author names, bibliographic data, and article content to group articles likely written by the […]

Citation metrics are often used to gauge the influence of scholarly articles and authors. Google Schoolar blog today announced the "Google Scholar Citations," a simple way to compute citation metrics and track them over time.

"We use a statistical model based on author names, bibliographic data, and article content to group articles likely written by the same author. You can quickly identify your articles using these groups. After you identify your articles, we collect citations to them, graph these citations over time, and compute your citation metrics. Three metrics are available: the widely used h-index, the i-10 index, which's the number of articles with at least ten citations, and the total number of citations to your articles. We compute each metric over all citations as well as over citations in articles published in the last five years. These metrics are automatically updated as we find new citations to your articles on the web," explains Google.

You can enable automatic addition of your newly published articles to your profile. This would instruct the Google Scholar indexing system to update your profile as it discovers new articles that are likely yours. And you can, of course, manually update your profile by adding missing articles, fixing bibliographic errors, and merging duplicate entries.

"You can also create a public profile with your articles and citation metrics. If you make your profile public, it can appear in Google Scholar search results when someone searches for your name (e.g., Richard Feynman, Paul Dirac). This'll make it easier for your colleagues worldwide to follow your work," informs Google.

T get started, visit this link.

[Source: Scholar blog]