Roslyn Compiler-As-A-Service (CaaS) Comes to Town, Microsoft Research Project

Microsoft plans to share more information on its "Roslyn" compiler-as-a-service (CaaS) project during its annual Microsoft Research Faculty Summit this week on July 19, in a session entitled "Refactoring with Roslyn Circus Comes to Town," Visual Studio Professional Lead Program Manager Karen Ng is slated to talk about how Roslyn will expose the Visual Basic […]

Microsoft plans to share more information on its "Roslyn" compiler-as-a-service (CaaS) project during its annual Microsoft Research Faculty Summit this week on July 19, in a session entitled "Refactoring with Roslyn Circus Comes to Town," Visual Studio Professional Lead Program Manager Karen Ng is slated to talk about how Roslyn will expose the Visual Basic and Visual C# compilers' code analysis.

Roslyn, at a high level, is Microsoft's vehicle for "taking .Net to the cloud." Microsoft's stated goal with Roslyn is to "build a compiler architecture that is amenable to use as a foundation for modern tools."

The description of that session from the Microsoft Research web site:

The moment we've been waiting for has finally arrived! The Microsoft .NET compilers are going to give access to the internals of the compilation pipeline, with handy IDE integration too! Language research on .NET will become easier than ever, permitting new kinds of refactoring and compiler/runtime research. In this talk, you'll see how to use the new APIs to do all sorts of fancy tricks. See automatic parallelization! Thrill to cross-language cut-and-paste! Be amazed at deep semantic analyses!

Microsoft is currently advertising for a Program Manager on the Roslyn team, in which Roslyn is described as "the next version of the C# and VB language and compiler." Per job post, Roslyn's purpose and position is as follows:

The C# and VB Languages team owns the incredible language features you've seen with LINQ (Language Integrated Query), Dynamic, and Async. Our next goal is a bold, new undertaking that will redefine how you think of compilers and where programming can go. Until now, the VB and C# compilers have been used as black boxes. You put text in, and you get out a binary file. In CodeName Roslyn, we're changing that dynamic by building an API that exposes compilers' analysis engine, and opening a world of new scenarios including REPL, write-your-own refactorings, C# and VB as scripting languages, and taking .NET to the cloud.

[Source: Microsoft Research, All about Microsoft]