Microsoft Research Unveiled Details About "Daytona" at Faculty Summit - Grants $1.4M to Faculty Fellowship

At the 12th annual Microsoft Research Faculty Summit today, Microsoft shared details about a new platform code-named "Daytona," which is designed to run a wide class of analytics and machine-learning algorithms on Windows Azure to allow scientists to analyze their largest data collections."Daytona" gives scientists more ways to use the cloud without being tied to […]

At the 12th annual Microsoft Research Faculty Summit today, Microsoft shared details about a new platform code-named "Daytona," which is designed to run a wide class of analytics and machine-learning algorithms on Windows Azure to allow scientists to analyze their largest data collections.

"Daytona" gives scientists more ways to use the cloud without being tied to one computer or needing detailed knowledge of cloud programming -- ultimately letting scientists be scientists," said Dan Reed, cvp of the Technology Policy Group at Microsoft. "We're very excited to empower the research community with this enhanced tool kit that will hopefully lead to greater scientific insights as a result of large-scale data analytics capabilities."

Microsoft officials also announced "a total grant distribution of $1.4 million to the recipients of the 2011 Microsoft Research Faculty Fellowship grants, awarded to eight promising young researchers around the world."

The eight Microsoft Research Faculty Fellows for 2011 and their areas of interest can be found at here.

The Faculty Summit will also "serve as a venue to showcase student work from an ongoing Microsoft initiative called Project "Hawaii." Launched in 2010, Project Hawaii is an experimental program that provides students with tools, services and equipment to create their own, cloud-enabled mobile applications using Windows Azure and Windows Phone 7," Microsoft stated.

The Project Hawaii team is working on expanding the program and will use the Faculty Summit to preview upcoming services for the next school year. Examples of student work from previous semesters can be found here.

"Some 300 students at 21 universities (see the list of schools) participated in the project earlier this year, building approximately 80 cloud-enhanced apps for the Windows Phone 7," revealed Microsoft.

A Project Hawaii app has the potential to save lives by recording a heart patient's EKG (electrocardiogram) and location and relaying these data to healthcare professionals via a web-based portal. Or maybe you're a lonely zombie, pining away for another brain-chomping buddy. Fear not: a Project Hawaii game app will enable you to infect other players when they're in physical proximity to you. Just think of the possibilities for a zombie mob-flash--or more seriously, the options for a variety of location-based games.

Several 2011 Project Hawaii apps will be demonstrated at the Microsoft Research Faculty Summit, which's in progress in Redmond, Washington, from July 18 to 20. One that's expected to generate great interest comes from Stanford University and was developed by a group of students in Professor Jay Borenstein's Computer Science Innovation class who collaborated with Microsoft Research to create myscience, a platform that enables scientists to launch citizen-science projects instantly. By using this WP7 experience, citizens can capture data through sensors on the phone and submit the data to various scientific studies.

More information about the project code-named "Dyatona" can be found here.

[Source: Microsoft Press]