Using 64-bit Access 2010? DON'T Install SP1....Read-on Why!

Are you using Access 2010, if Yes! Have you installed Service Pack 1 (SP1) - incase, ‘No', just hold-on and DON't install SP1 for the time being and read-on, because customer who have installed 64-bit SP1 facing some issues. Read-n….According to Access blog,"A customer's post on TechNet reporting an error folks are seeing after applying […]

Are you using Access 2010, if Yes! Have you installed Service Pack 1 (SP1) - incase, ‘No', just hold-on and DON't install SP1 for the time being and read-on, because customer who have installed 64-bit SP1 facing some issues. Read-n….

According to Access blog,

"A customer's post on TechNet reporting an error folks are seeing after applying SP1 to 64-bit Access installations and then trying to use a wizard:

The database cannot be opened because the VBA project contained in it cannot be read. ... To open the database and delete the VBA project without creating a backup copy, click OK.

On clicking OK, Access doesn't open the database, offering this error message:

The code contains a syntax error, or a <DB_NAME> function you need is not available. If the syntax is correct, check the Control Wizards subkey or the Libraries key in the <DB_NAME> section of the windows registry to verify that the entries you need are listed and available.

"

It's because, the "VBE7.DLL file update included in the service pack prevents the opening of .ACCDE files compiled using RTM 64-bit Access," KB2533794. Because wizards are .ACCDE files, they could trigger the error depending on when they were compiled.

Steven Thomas on Access blog said the customer who posted reports, stated that "uninstalling the service pack restores the functionality, and advises that people with 64-bit Access wait until a solution is provided before applying SP1."

Update: Here's a fairly simple workaround:

  1. Delete all files in the <%Program Files%>\Microsoft Office\Office 14\ACCWIZ\ folder
  2. Boot Access - Setup will restore the missing wizard files.

[Source: Access blog]