Report: Google Has 'No Plans' to Dump Blogger Brand

A few days ago On July 5th, diTii reported that as part of a change in branding for most of Google's divisions, for the public launch of Google+ -- Google would soon dump the long running blogging company Blogger and would be branding it to Google Blogs.According ot reports Google has such plans to get […]

A few days ago On July 5th, diTii reported that as part of a change in branding for most of Google's divisions, for the public launch of Google+ -- Google would soon dump the long running blogging company Blogger and would be branding it to Google Blogs.

According ot reports Google has such plans to get rid of the Blogger name for its blog division. "A source familiar with Google's Blogger division told us that contrary to web rumors, the search giant has no plans to send the Blogger brand on its way. Or to paraphrase Mark Twain, rumors of Blogger's death have been greatly exaggerated and re-tweeted," reports GigaOM.

"If true it was a confounding decision for Blogger perhaps is one of the strongest web brands even though it is more than a decade old. When I asked Google, they declined to comment."

GigaOM also talked to Blogger founder Evan Williams (also the former CEO of Twitter) who stated following on the Blogger's renaming:

Regarding the rumored Blogger name change: It's kinda sad for me and those involved with Blogger, but I can see the argument why it makes sense for Google. The good news is, whatever the name, Blogger is getting better and is not going way. The saddest part is that the Blogger [b] logo, created by Derek Powazek (later refreshed by Doug Bowman) is one of the best web logos of all time. Hopefully they won't get rid of that. 🙂

[…]Williams is also quoted as saying, "I'm guessing if you talked to folks at Blogger or WordPress (see disclosure), they'd say the numbers are bigger than ever, which makes it a difficult case to say classic blogging is gone." He added that people need to perhaps concentrate more to update a blog than to write a quick post on Twitter or Facebook, saying, "Maybe that means the active blogging user base is only tens of millions of people, globally, instead of hundreds of millions for these other services."

[Source: GigaOM]