Google's Access to Twitter's Firehose Expired, Caused Realtime Search 'Mysteriously' Disappeared

Eariler in the day, diTii reported that Google's realtime search is no more avialable. Well as it turns out the reason behind the mysterious disappearnce was, "on July 2nd Google's access to Twitter's special firehose expired and it pulled the feature in order to rethink its strategy."Bing, which had a similar deal with Twitter still […]

Eariler in the day, diTii reported that Google's realtime search is no more avialable. Well as it turns out the reason behind the mysterious disappearnce was, "on July 2nd Google's access to Twitter's special firehose expired and it pulled the feature in order to rethink its strategy."

Bing, which had a similar deal with Twitter still has access to the firehose. Today comes the reason why: Google's agreement with Twitter to carry its results has expired, taking with it much of the content that was in the service with it.

Google issued this explanation:

Since October of 2009, we have had an agreement with Twitter to include their updates in our search results through a special feed, and that agreement expired on July 2.

While we will not have access to this special feed from Twitter, information on Twitter that's publicly available to our crawlers will still be searchable and discoverable on Google.

Google Realtime Search had carried content from a variety of services beyond Twitter includes:

Twitter tweets, Google News links, Google Blog Search links, Newly created web pages, Freshly updated web pages, FriendFeed updates, Jaiku updates, Identi.ca updates, TwitArmy updates, Google Buzz posts, MySpace updates, Facebook fan page updates, Quora, Gowolla, Plixi, Me2day, Twitgoo.

Twitter was the by far the most dominant content within the service. It's unclear why the agreement was allowed to expire. Twitter stated:

Since October 2009, Twitter has provided Google with the stream of public tweets for incorporation into their real-time search product and other uses. That agreement has now expired. We continue to provide this type of access to Microsoft, Yahoo!, NTT Docomo, Yahoo! Japan and dozens of other smaller developers. And, we work with Google in many other ways.

For its part, Google said: "Twitter has been a valuable partner for nearly two years, and we remain open to exploring other collaborations in the future."

Google has sent the following statement addressing the issue above:

While we will not have access to this special feed from Twitter, information on Twitter that's publicly available to our crawlers will still be searchable and discoverable on Google.

As for other features such as social search, they will continue to exist, though without Twitter data from the special feed.

[Via: SEL]