In U.S. iOS Platform Accounted 53.1 Percent of Digital Device Traffic, Reports comScore's Worldwide Digital Traffic Analysis

comScore recently released Device Essentials, an exciting new solution providing insight into digital traffic coming from all types of devices on a global basis."Device Essentials utilizes comScore's Unified Digital Measurement (UDM) methodology, which captures media web traffic coming from more than a million domains tagging with comScore around the world. In May alone, comScore observed […]

comScore recently released Device Essentials, an exciting new solution providing insight into digital traffic coming from all types of devices on a global basis.

"Device Essentials utilizes comScore's Unified Digital Measurement (UDM) methodology, which captures media web traffic coming from more than a million domains tagging with comScore around the world. In May alone, comScore observed 150 billion census-level page views worldwide," the company stated.

Today, the comapny has shared several of the interesting new findings based on their analysis of 15 different countries reported in Device Essentials.

Per comScore's blog post:

  1. Mobile phones are second only to computers in driving digital traffic: While PCs accounting at least 93% of digital traffic across the 15 markets studied, mobile contributing the most amount of traffic following PCs. U.S. has the highest share of non-computer device traffic at 6.2%, with mobile phones making up 4.2% overall. Singapore and the U.K., also have considerably high shares of non-computer device traffic at 5.9% and 5.3%.
  2. Apple leads the way for non-computer device traffic across markets: In U.S. alone, iOS accounted 53.1% of mobile traffic, led by traffic coming from iPhone 23.5%, iPad 21.8% and iPod Touch 7.8%. iOS comprised mobile traffic, topping out at 83.0% in Australia, Canada, and Singapore.
  3. Android outpaces iPhone in U.S. traffic despite overall lead for iOS: In the U.S., Android phones account 35.6% of non-computer traffic vs. 23.5% from iPhones.
  4. Mobile traffic is not only driven by smartphones: India account a significant amount of non-computer device traffic at 94.8%, but this activity is driven by primarily by feature phones 71.9% of non-computer device traffic as opposed to smartphones 22.9% share.
  5. Tablets account for a significant share of non-computer traffic: Two-thirds of the markets in this analysis saw tablets driving > 20 of all non-computer device traffic. The Netherlands 35.6%, Canada 35.2%, and Brazil 33.4%, led the way.
  6. Apple dominates the tablet market around the world: In 13 of the 15 markets, Apple captured at least 95% of the tablet market, while Android tablets accounted for most of the remaining tablet share.
  7. E-readers and gaming consoles barely register any traffic: In all of the markets studied, these other devices contributed less than 1% to overall digital traffic, with the highest share of traffic seen in Canada and the U.S. at 0.6%.
  8. iPod Touches drive one fifth of the traffic of iPhones: iPod Touches actually drove about one fifth the level of traffic across most markets. In Argentina and Canada, iPods had even greater relative importance, driving approximately half of the traffic of iPhones. At nearly 15% of non-computer device traffic, Canada is the only market where the iPod Touch accounts for more than 10% of non-computer traffic.
  9. WiFi access fuels the U.S. non-computer device landscape: Interestingly, > 54.5% of all non-computer traffic in the U.S. comes via WiFi connection. 91.9% of U.S. iPad traffic comes via WiFi access, indicating that the majority of iPad surfing is done at home, at the office, or in other WiFi-enabled locations. Similarly, this high percentage may also reflect that many people aren't paying for additional 3G service for tablets at the moment.
  10. Even across devices, WiFi and mobile network activity varies: In the U.S., 78.3% of total digital traffic coming from Android phones occurred over mobile networks, compared to 52.5% on iPhones. A significant 47.5% of iPhone traffic came through a WiFi connection, reflecting the importance iOS device users place on being able to easily connect via WiFi.

[Source: comScore blog]