Web FWD (Forward) New Innovation Accelerator from Mozilla Launched

Mozilla launched a new program called Web FWD (pronounced Web Forward), designed to help spur projects that focus on open web technologies -- and invites teams to spend four weeks working in Mozilla offices, where they'll learn from top experts in web technologies and have access to Mozilla resources. Applications are now being accepted, and […]

Mozilla launched a new program called Web FWD (pronounced Web Forward), designed to help spur projects that focus on open web technologies -- and invites teams to spend four weeks working in Mozilla offices, where they'll learn from top experts in web technologies and have access to Mozilla resources. Applications are now being accepted, and the first group of teams will begin working from Mozilla offices in August.

In a nutshell: Apply with your project (which fits into the predefined interest areas and will be built with the traits that are important for the open Web), get accepted, come to San Francisco for our 4 week camps, build/learn/mingle, launch your product, decide how to take it forward.

Each participant will receive $2,000 for the month to cover food and living expenses. "We want them to be worry-free", Finette says, so that the teams can really focus on their projects.

Pascal Finette, who heads Mozilla Labs, says that the project was inspired by the success of programs like Y Combinator -- though there are plenty of differences. Unlike YC, which takes a modest equity stake in participating companies, Mozilla's not out to make money. In fact, all code written during the four-week program must be open sourced (teams can later fork their code and continue to build their project into a business if they'd like -- Mozilla will even make the VC introductions). Mozilla will also consider giving promising products that stick with the open-source model additional funding and resources.

Finette says that the ideal applicants will be working on projects that are deeply related to open web technologies -- things like online identity, social, personalization, and, more broadly, a "mobile first" approach to designing web applications. "We're not looking for the next big online game", he says. Applicants don't have to have a full project built when they apply, but Mozilla will be looking for some basic groundwork -- things like mockups, some rough code, and a tangible demo (even if it's far from a minimum viable product).

If you'are reading this text, it's because your browser doesn't support the HTML5 'video' element.

More details can be found here.