Facebook's New Enforcement System Bans A Large Number of Applications

Facebook's developer forum is filled with threads as developers cry foul, over their applications disabled without warning.The most significant issue is that many apps with tens of thousands of daily active users go mostly unnoticed by Facebook since they're small in comparison to large apps like Zynga's, which've millions of daily users. The large apps […]

Facebook's developer forum is filled with threads as developers cry foul, over their applications disabled without warning.

The most significant issue is that many apps with tens of thousands of daily active users go mostly unnoticed by Facebook since they're small in comparison to large apps like Zynga's, which've millions of daily users. The large apps that shut down includes Photo Effect, Social Interview, and Good Reads, although many more are complaining about the issue.

"The sudden bans are the result of an automated Facebook bot, which automatically shuts down applications that it deems to be spammy. Obviously neither users nor Facebook want spammy applications on the platform, but there's one problem: Facebook recently tweaked this bot to be much more aggressive, and it didn't give developers any warning before it set it loose."

Facebook declined to share any data on how many apps have been affected -- however, they'v issued a statement on company's developer blog:

Over the past year, we've worked hard to improve our automated systems that catch spam and malicious behavior on Platform. These systems allowed us to cut spam on Platform by 95 percent in 2010, greatly increasing user satisfaction and trust with apps on Facebook. We've been getting a lot of user feedback recently, spiking significantly over the past week, about the amount of app spam on their feeds and walls. To ensure that users have a positive experience and developers can build in a healthy ecosystem, we run automated screens that detect apps receiving large amounts of negative user feedback. Recently, we've updated our enforcement systems to identify and reduce unwanted user-to-user posts created by apps. An example of these unwanted posts is when a user posts content to a friend's Wall using an app and the friend removes the post, marks the post as spam or blocks the app.

We encourage you to proactively review user posts and make sure that they provide engaging and welcome content. In addition, we'll be rolling out new App Insights in a few weeks that'll let you better monitor negative user feedback (e.g., posts marked as spam and stream story hides). For examples and explanations of user feedback click here.

For all apps that've been disabled or have had features disabled, you should have received an email at the Contact Email address listed in the Developer App with details. If you believe your app has affected by this in error, please contact us here. Note that no content is deleted if an app is disabled. If an app is re-enabled, all the content comes back.

[Via: Developer blog]