Nvidia's "Kal-El' Quad-core Mobile Chip Demonstrated [Video]

Nvidia has been working on its next generation quad-core mobile chip code named, "Kal-El".The video, below shows a demo-game called "Glowball" that'll actually be released to the Android Market when Kal-El based Android devices are released.Glowball also leverages the accelerometer inside the device, affecting real-time movements of drapes throughout the game. As the user tilts […]

Nvidia has been working on its next generation quad-core mobile chip code named, "Kal-El".

The video, below shows a demo-game called "Glowball" that'll actually be released to the Android Market when Kal-El based Android devices are released.

Glowball also leverages the accelerometer inside the device, affecting real-time movements of drapes throughout the game. As the user tilts the device, the gravity in the scene changes and drapes respond accordingly. The movements are calculated using physics and are simulated across Project Kal-El's four CPU cores. Again, no canned animations. As the ball rolls through the drapes, they respond how you'd expect them to in real life. In addition, as the ball collides into the jack-in-the-boxes and barrels, the scene responds. Notice how the visual quality degrades when only two CPU cores are used. It's clear that the quad-core processor in Project Kal-El is required for this level of realism.

The video and demo shows off the lighting features of the processor. The video points out that the demo is being run on pre-production silicon which means the final production version should be between 24 to 30 percent faster than even this impressive video shows.

The light reflections are dynamic and are handled in real time, making Glowball's visuals much more realistic than most mobile based games that have static and flat lighting. The ball also moves into stacks of barrels which fall down more realistically. While PC gamers are certainly used to such in-game physics effects having such features on a smartphone or tablet-based game is currently not possible.

To further demonstrate the point, two of Kal-El's four processor cores are turned off during the video demo. The reduced frame rate of Glowball is instantly unplayable with all of the lighting and physics effects turned on.