Microsoft Surface Input Simulator Helps you Write Apps on Windows 7 Machine

Surface 2.0 is still one of the coolest technologies - largely down to the PixelSense technology it employs to shave 20 some inches of depth of Surface. Microsoft will be releasing the Surface Input Simulator as part of the Microsoft Surface 2 SDK."The simulator lets developers write and test Surface applications on any Windows 7 […]

Surface 2.0 is still one of the coolest technologies - largely down to the PixelSense technology it employs to shave 20 some inches of depth of Surface. Microsoft will be releasing the Surface Input Simulator as part of the Microsoft Surface 2 SDK.

"The simulator lets developers write and test Surface applications on any Windows 7 machine, even if it's not connected to a Surface unit, even if it's not touch-enabled. The simulator lets you simulate fingers, tags and blobs, and simulate the tilt of a device. You'll still need to test your application on a Surface device to see how real people work with it in the real environment, but you can make a lot more progress on it before that point than you could before."

"As the Microsoft Surface 2 SDK will allow you to write applications that target both Microsoft Surface Hardware and Windows Touch Enabled PCs, we also provided a mechanism for you to simulate different hardware capabilities. You do that by clicking on the Settings… button, and then applying any changes you make to the Hardware capabilities.

One of the cool things about our new Simulator is that it will work on any Windows 7 machine. In the past there was a minimum monitor resolution requirement of 1280 by 960. This is exciting for me as I do most of my development on my laptop."

[Source: Microsoft Surface blog]