BlueStacks Brings Android Apps on x86-based Systems

BlueStacks, a Silicon Valley based has officially "opened for business" with $7.5 million of series A funding, after working for nearly three years on a solution for delivering Android applications on systems with x86-based processors.After playing with her father's Android phone, the child of one of BlueStacks' founding engineers asked if she could get those […]

BlueStacks, a Silicon Valley based has officially "opened for business" with $7.5 million of series A funding, after working for nearly three years on a solution for delivering Android applications on systems with x86-based processors.

After playing with her father's Android phone, the child of one of BlueStacks' founding engineers asked if she could get those apps on her MSI netbook.

And in short, that's what BlueStacks has done with virtualization and shared drivers. Android apps can run either as apps or as icons on the Windows desktop, or the whole system can switch from Windows to the Android OS. It's an ideal solution for convertible notebooks. In notebook mode, you can run Windows, and in tablet mode, you can run Android.

"From the naive user's point of view, these are all just apps," said BlueStacks President and CEO Rosen Sharma. "They don't care if it's webOS or Windows or Android or that it's virtualization. In the end, it's just an app."

Now officially out of "stealth mode", BlueStacks will be showing off its Android + Windows solution at Computex in Taipei beginning on May 31.