Adobe Tops in PC Vulnerability 'Acrobat, Reader, Flash and Shockwave', Beats Microsoft, Kaspersky Labs

Kaspersky Lab has reported that popular Adobe applications such as Acrobat Reader and Flash are on a list of top 10 vulnerabilities for the fist quarter of 2011. Last year, Microsoft was dominating by populating most of the list, but now, Adobe is dominating.In first place was an Adobe Acrobat Reader buffer flow vulnerability, which […]

Kaspersky Lab has reported that popular Adobe applications such as Acrobat Reader and Flash are on a list of top 10 vulnerabilities for the fist quarter of 2011. Last year, Microsoft was dominating by populating most of the list, but now, Adobe is dominating.

In first place was an Adobe Acrobat Reader buffer flow vulnerability, which was found on 40.78 per cent of infected computers, according to Kaspersky Lab figures. Flash Player vulnerabilities took second and third place, while more Reader and Acrobat flaws as well as a Shockwave Player issue took two other places in the top 10.

Flash player vulnerabilities came in second and third place on the list.

Java took both fourth and fifth place while Apple's Quicktime came in sixth place and Winamp came in seventh place. Apparently Java virtual machines are a common target for hackers.

However this time, Microsoft's Office OneNote had a vulnerability that came in eight place on Kaspersky's list.

More Adobe Acrobat Reader flaws and Shockwave player vulnerabilities rounded off the list.

Kaspersky apparently found 28,752,203 vulnerable applications on computers it analysed. Kaspersky also noted that as of the begining of this year, a new trend has emerged where hackers will try to attack large corporations rather than home users.

"This is more risky for the attackers because unlike home users, major corporations can and will retaliate. However, the stakes and thus the potential rewards involved with targeted attacks on corporations are higher and there are fewer competitors in this segment of the black market."

[Source: Securelist, Via: Inquirer]