Forrester: What The Post-PC Era Really Means?

Forrester Research's new report deconstructing the "post-PC era" buzzword, since Steve Jobs announced at the iPad 2 launch event that Apple now gets a majority of its revenue from "post-PC devices," including the iPod, iPhone, and iPad--a major milestone for a company that was originally named "Apple Computer."The phrase was also part of the public […]

Forrester Research's new report deconstructing the "post-PC era" buzzword, since Steve Jobs announced at the iPad 2 launch event that Apple now gets a majority of its revenue from "post-PC devices," including the iPod, iPhone, and iPad--a major milestone for a company that was originally named "Apple Computer."

The phrase was also part of the public discourse in 2004, when IBM sold its PC unit and former Sun Microsystems CEO Jonathan Schwartz told The New York Timesthat "We've been in the post-PC era for four years now," noting that wireless mobile handset sales had already far surpassed PC sales around the world.

It's real, they say, and consequences will "revolutionize computing product strategy". When Steve Jobs refers to Apple's "post-PC" product portfolio, we hear more than just a buzzword. The post-PC era is real, and its consequences will revolutionize computing product strategy. In this report, we define the post-PC era and the stages in which post-PC product strategies will develop.

In short, there are four facets to the post-PC era -- ubiquity, instant-on performance/casual use, intimate experience and physical interaction with content.

No doubt Steve Jobs, the post-PC era poster child, is going to love the report. "It's so much more intimate than a laptop and it's so much more capable than a smartphone", Jobs told the audience of journalists at the January 2010 iPad unveiling, explaining what makes Apple's tablet a category-defining product of the post-PC era. Apple and its boss have been using the "post-PC era" phrase in marketing collateral ever since.

Reference: What The Post-PC Era Really Means

[Source:Forrester blog]