America's K-12 Schools Not Preparing Kids for Digital Age, Study from NCSA and Microsoft

A study sponsored by Microsoft released from the National Cyber Security Alliance (NCSA), finds that schools are ill-prepared to teach students the basics of online safety, security and ethics — skills that’re necessary in today’s digital times. At the surface, America’s K–12 schools embrace the digital age, with dedicated computer labs, technology-integrated classrooms and students well-versed in the […]

A study sponsored by Microsoft released from the National Cyber Security Alliance (NCSA), finds that schools are ill-prepared to teach students the basics of online safety, security and ethics — skills that’re necessary in today’s digital times.

At the surface, America’s K–12 schools embrace the digital age, with dedicated computer labs, technology-integrated classrooms and students well-versed in the Internet as a means for homework and a social life. That said, administrators, teachers and IT coordinators don’t agree on the best approach to ensure children are prepared for the digital age.

“The 2011 edition of State of K–12 Cyberethics, Cybersafety and Cybersecurity Curriculum in the U.S. Survey, previously published by NCSA in 2008 and 2010, found contention among school leaders regarding whether online safety, security and ethics should even be taught as part of a district curriculum. Only 55% of teachers strongly agree that cybersecurity, cybersafety and cyberethics should be taught in schools as part of the curriculum, while more than 82% of administrators and 85% of IT specialists share those same strong feelings.”

“Further pointing to a disconnect, 51% of teachers agree their school districts do an adequate job of preparing students for online safety, security and ethics, while 81% of administrators and 81% of IT coordinators believe their districts are doing an adequate job.”

Microsoft Press