Oakland County Women Sue Google for $50M Over Android's Location Tracking

Following the news that Android devices track & store location data and sends back to the parent company, two Oakland County women have filed a $50 million class-action lawsuit against Google to stop the company from selling phones with Android software that can track a user's location.The class action lawsuit was filed Wednesday in U.S. […]

Following the news that Android devices track & store location data and sends back to the parent company, two Oakland County women have filed a $50 million class-action lawsuit against Google to stop the company from selling phones with Android software that can track a user's location.

The class action lawsuit was filed Wednesday in U.S. District Court in Detroit, Michigan, comes a week after Google acknowledged that phones running its Android software store some location data directly on phones for a short time from users who have chosen to use GPS services. Google said that was done "to provide a better mobile experience on Android devices." It also stressed that any location sharing is done with the user's permission.

In the lawsuit, filed by Julie Brown and Kayla Molaski, the women said they didn't approve. The tracking capability puts "users at serous risk of privacy invasions, including stalking," the women's lawyer Steven Budaj wrote in the complaint.

The lawsuit is believed to be the first of its kind filed in the United States.

On a related note, Google will send a representative to testify before the U.S. Senate in May for a hearing on mobile privacy, the Washington Post reported.

[Via: Detroit News]