Yahoo! Announces to Keep Search Records for 18 Months

Yahoo! announced the change to their log file data retention policy to meet the needs of consumers for personalization and relevance, while living up to their expectations of trust. Yahoo plans to begin storing search logs for 18 months -- as well as potentially storing other types of user information for longer periods of time. […]

Yahoo! announced the change to their log file data retention policy to meet the needs of consumers for personalization and relevance, while living up to their expectations of trust. Yahoo plans to begin storing search logs for 18 months -- as well as potentially storing other types of user information for longer periods of time. After notifying users, Yahoo says this new policy will be in effect sometime after mid-July.

The new policy brings the company in line with Google Inc., which dominates the industry, and Microsoft Corp., which powers Yahoo's search results under a partnership reached last year. Those companies failed to follow Yahoo Inc.'s lead when it shortened the amount of time that it keeps online search records to 90 days in most cases.

"We'll hold raw search log files for 18 months and we'll be closely examining what the right policy and time frame should be for other log file data. In announcing this change, we've gone back to the drawing board to ensure that our policies will support the innovative products we want to deliver for our consumers," says Anne Toth, Chief Trust Officer.

Toth, on Friday said:

"Over the past several years it's clear that the Internet has changed, our business has changed, and the competitive landscape has changed. We've gone back to the drawing board to ensure that our policies will support the innovative products we want to deliver for our consumers."

Toth wrote that the change is an attempt "to meet the needs of our consumers for personalization and relevance," and that the move is an attempt to keep up with social networking sites and mobile apps, and to allow "highly personalzed services," for which a larger set of user behavior data is needed.

[Source: AP, Yahoo Policy blog]