Microsoft Raises Google's Misleading Security Claims to the Government

David Howard, CVP & Deputy General Counsel at Microsoft has accused Google of falsely claiming that its Google Apps for Government had been certified under government security standards.In a blog post today, Howard said that "a batch of court documents had been unsealed and had revealed one particularly striking development: the United States Department of […]

David Howard, CVP & Deputy General Counsel at Microsoft has accused Google of falsely claiming that its Google Apps for Government had been certified under government security standards.

In a blog post today, Howard said that "a batch of court documents had been unsealed and had revealed one particularly striking development: the United States Department of Justice had rejected Google's claim that Google Apps for Government, Google's cloud-based suite for government customers, has been certified under the Federal Information Security Management Act. Given the number of times that Google has touted this claim, this was no small development."

Howard continues writing that "Last year, the Department of the Interior chose Microsoft to power the departments new cloud-based email system. In October, Google sued the government. "This meant significant delay for the Department of the Interior, which was trying to save millions of dollars and upgrade the email services for its 88,000 employees."

"Google filed a motion for a preliminary injunction telling the court three times in a single document (see pages 18, 29, & 37), that Google Apps for Government is certified under FISMA.

Google has repeated this statement in many other places as well. Indeed, for several months and as recently as this morning, Google's website states, "Google Apps for Government -- now with FISMA certification." And as if that's not sufficient, Google goes farther on another webpage and states "Google Apps for Government is certified and accredited under the FISMA."," wrote Howard.

"Open competition should involve accurate competition. It's time for Google to stop telling governments something that is not true."

[Source: Microsoft on the Issues]