Intel Xeon E7 Server Processors Unveiled

On April 5th, Intel unveiled its latest server processor range, the "Xeon E7."Kirk Skaugen, vp of Intels' Data Center Group, explained how the E7 isn't only more energy efficient but also up to 40% faster than previous the Xeon 7500 range. "One rack of servers using the new chip has more power than 18 dual-core […]

On April 5th, Intel unveiled its latest server processor range, the "Xeon E7."

Kirk Skaugen, vp of Intels' Data Center Group, explained how the E7 isn't only more energy efficient but also up to 40% faster than previous the Xeon 7500 range. "One rack of servers using the new chip has more power than 18 dual-core Intel servers from five years ago," said the article, which means that, combined with the claimed 93% power reduction, data centers around the globe could potentially save millions of dollars by using the new chip.

The chips run built-in encryption faster as well, which is particularly important because Mr. Skaugen said that some IT managers turned off encryption built into chips to avoid slow performance. The security features are unrelated to Intel’s recent acquisition of McAfee, the computer security company.

One other main feature which may help to convert many IT admins over the new range is the optimised encryption performance to speed ratio, which, according to Skaugen, was a wasted feature on the previous range as many IT Managers "turned off encryption built into chips to avoid slow performance."

According to the Intel Press Release, the current models available are the E7-8800/4800 and 2800 and the company claims the new range will "set a new standard for high-end computing applications, including business intelligence, real-time data analytics and virtualization."

The company's launch event went to the extreme by renting out an anterior bank and holding the press event in the vault. The aim of this stunt was to show off and reinforce the chips reliability and security features which're aimed for users carrying out 'Mission Critical' tasks, such as banks. According to the New York Times, Intel placed "Secret Service agent lookalikes who wore sunglasses and checked for identification" in the basement.