Android Browser Beats iOS Safari, 52 Percent Faster than iPhone's, Blaze Study

Blaze has released a study stemming from 45,000 Android and iOS tests, the Android's browser posted faster load times on 84%. On average, pages loaded in 2.1 seconds on Android -- about 52% faster than mobile Safari. Median load time was 2.144 seconds for Android versus 3.254 seconds for the iPhone.The devices used for testing […]

Blaze has released a study stemming from 45,000 Android and iOS tests, the Android's browser posted faster load times on 84%. On average, pages loaded in 2.1 seconds on Android -- about 52% faster than mobile Safari. Median load time was 2.144 seconds for Android versus 3.254 seconds for the iPhone.

Android vs. iPhone: Page Load chart

The devices used for testing include a Nexus One running Android 2.3 and an iPhone 4 with, presumably, iOS 4.3. Both operating systems sport WebKit-based browsers.

It’s worth mentioning however that whether the webpage viewed was optimized for mobile devices made a difference. While non-mobile sites had a median load time of 2.180 seconds for Android versus 3.463 seconds for the iPhone, on mobile sites the difference was practically non-existent: 2.085 seconds for Android versus iPhone's 2.024 seconds.

One of the more interesting takeaways from the Blaze report is that the company didn't find a correlation between the improved JavaScript engines in iOS 4.3 and Android 2.3 and overall browsing speed. "We naturally assumed that the new versions will show significantly better load times," states the Blaze post. "But we assumed wrong. When comparing iPhone 4.3 to iPhone 4.2 we saw no noticeable improvement, and Android 2.3 was only marginally faster than Android 2.2."

Android vs. iOS :Page Load test

Blaze does acknowledge that a perfect page load test is practically infeasible. The amount of unique variables that factor into browsing performance is staggering, and trying to standardize each one would be a waste of time and resources. So, while this isn’t definitive by any means, it definitely favors Android, and there’s something to be said for that.

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