Microsoft Set Up Windows Azure Based 'Disaster Response' Portal in Japan

Microsoft is making its cloud-computing service available to governments and nonprofits on the ground in Japan, which was hit by a 8.9-magnitude earthquake at 2:46 p.m. Japan local time.Microsoft said its disaster response cloud based communications portal, based on Windows Azure, is available for governments and non-profits to communicate.Here is a statement from Microsoft about […]

Microsoft is making its cloud-computing service available to governments and nonprofits on the ground in Japan, which was hit by a 8.9-magnitude earthquake at 2:46 p.m. Japan local time.

Microsoft said its disaster response cloud based communications portal, based on Windows Azure, is available for governments and non-profits to communicate.

Here is a statement from Microsoft about the disaster:

Microsoft has activated its Disaster Response protocol and is currently accounting for all of its employees and assessing all of its facilities for any impact. The company is reaching out to its customers and partners to conduct impact assessments. We do know at this time that there is no disruption to Microsoft's cloud based and hosted services. Microsoft is starting to reach out to provide free incident support to help its customers and partners impacted by the earthquake to get their operations back up and running. The company provides free temporary software licenses to all impacted customers and partners as well as lead governments, non-profit partners and institutions involved in disaster response efforts.

Bing has maps and plans to provide before and after images for a disaster-response mapping application.

Microsoft also has set up a site that includes links to help Japanese victims.