Steve Ballmer Microsoft's CEO Looking for Engineers As Top Execs

According to a Bloomberg, "Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer is looking to further increase the technical chops and product expertise among the company's top executives, as early as this month."The move would expand on an effort to promote managers with engineering skills and experience executing product plans - - a bid to help Microsoft catch up […]

According to a Bloomberg, "Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer is looking to further increase the technical chops and product expertise among the company's top executives, as early as this month."

The move would expand on an effort to promote managers with engineering skills and experience executing product plans - - a bid to help Microsoft catch up with rivals such as Apple and Google in Web services, smartphones and tablet computers. The overhaul also may quell criticism from the board and investors that Microsoft is falling behind in some markets.

Four top executives have left the company since May, and says further management changes "may quell criticism from the board and investors that Microsoft is falling behind in some markets." Microsoft isn't commenting on the report.

"You see the engineering team ascending because Steve is realizing that there's a need to execute on a vision and in order to do that you've to actually understand how software is built," said Wes Miller, an analyst at the Kirkland, Washington- based research firm Directions on Microsoft. "It's a whole other thing to be able to say, "I've been at Microsoft, I understand software, and what you're saying will or willn't work.""

The CEO wants to rectify Microsoft's misfires in mobile phones and tablet computers, as well as ensure that the company doesn't fall behind in cloud software. Cloud technology lets customers store their apps and information in remote data centers and access them over the Internet.

Ballmer has already shown a desire to appoint engineers or product experts to run divisions. Stephen Elop, who left to run Nokia Oyj in September, was replaced by engineering chief Kurt DelBene, rather than marketing executive Chris Capossela. Elop had run Microsoft's business unit, its biggest source of sales.

[tags]hiring,management,executives.cloud technology[/tags]

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