DLD11: Google's Marissa Mayer on Eric Schmidt - Facebook's Dan Rose Talks Platform, Ads And Mark Zuckerberg

In a panel on "Open Innovation" at the DLD Conference in Munich, Google's Marissa Mayer was asked about Eric Schmidt's transition to a new role at the company, handing over the reins to co-founder Larry Page.Mayer said:For a long time, Google has been run by a triumvirate, and last week we announced a reshuffling. It's […]

In a panel on "Open Innovation" at the DLD Conference in Munich, Google's Marissa Mayer was asked about Eric Schmidt's transition to a new role at the company, handing over the reins to co-founder Larry Page.

Mayer said:

For a long time, Google has been run by a triumvirate, and last week we announced a reshuffling. It's important to stress that roles have changed, but Larry, Eric and Sergey will continue to lead the company.

There's been a lot of speculation about this in the press and beyond, but we're genuinely excited about the changes. Let's not forget Larry has been CEO of Google before.

Schmidt tweeted something amusing about the reshuffle, saying "adult supervision was no longer needed". It was meant as a joke, but I'm personally really excited to see the more mature management side of Larry.

Larry's passion has always been products, so he'll be focused a lot on the technical part of the equation, and execution across the board.

Dan Rose, VP of Partnerships and Platform Marketing at Facebook, took the stage at DLD Conference in Munich this morning in a conversation with David Kirkpatrick, author of The Facebook Effect. Here's a few quotes:

Q: Has Zuckerberg changed at all because of the enormous growth?

A: No, Zuckerberg is very similar to how he was when Facebook had only 100 million users; we're at over 600 million today and not much has changed.

Q: You're quite an expert in monetization, so I know you like data. Facebook has long been working with Nielsen on marketing research -- what has been the discovery so far?

A: At Facebook, we think of advertising as a unique opportunity. Digital advertising was different from everything that came before because of the sheer scale, the possibilities for two-way communication, and so on.

But early Internet advertising initiatives were rudimentary in our view -- we think about advertising in a unique way because of the social aspect.

To answer your question, Nielsen has been actively measuring the impact of advertising efforts on Facebook, and what we've found is that when people see ads with their friends' names in them, there's a 60% uptake in brand advertising value.

[tags]dld2011,zyngz[/tags]

[Source]