Matt Cutts "Buying Google Ads Doesn't Increase Site's Rankings in Google's Search Results"

Google recently has come under fire for becoming victim to webspam which spoofs search results. Today, Matt Cutts addressed the Google search and search engine spam saying,"Recently we've indexed a lot of good content and some spam, as we've increased both our size and freshness in recent months. To solve this, we've launched a redesigned […]

Google recently has come under fire for becoming victim to webspam which spoofs search results. Today, Matt Cutts addressed the Google search and search engine spam saying,

"Recently we've indexed a lot of good content and some spam, as we've increased both our size and freshness in recent months. To solve this, we've launched a redesigned document-level classifier that's better at detecting spam on individual web pages, e.g., repeated spammy words-- the sort of phrases you tend to see in junky, automated, self-promoting blog comments.

Also improved ability to detect hacked sites, a major source of spam in 2010. And we're evaluating multiple changes that should help drive spam levels even lower, including one change that primarily affects sites that copy others' content and sites with low levels of original content.

We'll continue to explore ways to reduce spam, including new ways for users to give more explicit feedback about spammy and low-quality sites."

In addition, Matt said Google will pay even more attention to "content farms." Cutts points out that Google has already taken steps against content farms (sites with shallow or low-quality content), pointing out the so-called "Mayday" update and other algorithmic tweaks made last year. But he also promises a renewed effort in 2011:

…we hear the feedback from the web loud and clear: people are asking for even stronger action on content farms and sites that consist primarily of spammy or low-quality content.[…]The fact is that we're not perfect, and combined with users' skyrocketing expectations of Google, these imperfections get magnified in perception. However, we can and should do better.

One misconception that we've seen in the last few weeks is the idea that Google doesnt take as strong action on spammy content in our index if those sites are serving Google ads. To be crystal clear:

  • Google absolutely takes action on sites that violate our quality guidelines regardless of whether they've Google ads
  • Buying / Displaying Google ads doesn't help a site's Google rankings

[tags]content farms,web,web spams,spammers,search results[/tags]

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