Matt Cutts Explained Google's Search Integrity to Federal Trade Commission

Google search engine guru Matt Cutts met with members of the Federal Trade Commission and staff on Capitol Hill this week to argue why the firm opposes federal rules on Internet search results, doing an "educational tour" to explain to US Federal Trade Commission members and congressional staffers that his company's search results don't require […]

Google search engine guru Matt Cutts met with members of the Federal Trade Commission and staff on Capitol Hill this week to argue why the firm opposes federal rules on Internet search results, doing an "educational tour" to explain to US Federal Trade Commission members and congressional staffers that his company's search results don't require government regulation.

At a press briefing at Google's Washington offices, Cutts came armed with a 89-page slide presentation called "Search Integrity." He explained that while search results are based on an computer algorhythm for the most relevant results, engineers such as Cutts go into the search engine routinely to manually weed out spam and viruses.

"The only reasons I know of to go in and change [search rankings] manually is for security, a court order or spam," Cutts said. "It is impossible to pay for a better ranking."

He said the task of fighting spam is enormous. Of the 1 billion search queries done each day, the site also deals with 1 million spam pages each hour.

In its argument against rules for search engines, Google says the firm has already disclosed much about its search process.

"People choose to go to Google," Cutts said. "There is no barrier to entry, and with one click they can choose to go to another search engine,."

[tags]antitrust,critics[/tags]

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