World IPv6 Day: A 24-hour Test Flight of the Next Generation Internet Protocol on June 8, 2011

Google and major web companies such as Facebook, Yahoo!, Akamai and Limelight Networks and other with Internet Society announced "World IPv6 Day, a 24-hour test flight of the next generation Internet protocol on June 8, 2011.Google say"We'll enable IPv6 on main websites for 24 hours. This's a crucial phase in the transition, because while IPv6 […]

Google and major web companies such as Facebook, Yahoo!, Akamai and Limelight Networks and other with Internet Society announced "World IPv6 Day, a 24-hour test flight of the next generation Internet protocol on June 8, 2011.

Google say"We'll enable IPv6 on main websites for 24 hours. This's a crucial phase in the transition, because while IPv6 is widely deployed in many networks, it's never been used at such a large scale before. We hope that by working together with a common focus, we can help the industry prepare for the new protocol, find and resolve any unexpected issues, and pave the way for global deployment.

The good news is that Internet users don't need to do anything special to prepare for World IPv6 Day. Our current measurements suggest that the vast majority (99.95%) of users will be unaffected," stated Google.

The story of Internet begins in 1977, when Vint Cerf, the program manager for the ARPA Internet research project, chose a 32-bit address format for an experiment in packet network interconnection.. For more than 30 years, 32-bit addresses have served us well, but now the Internet is running out of space.

IPv6 is the only long-term solution, but as the chart below shows, it hasn't yet been widely deployed. With IPv4 addresses expected to run out in 2011, only 0.2% of Internet users have native IPv6 connectivity:

ipv6 connecitivity chart

[tags]web,ipv6,ipv4,arpa,vint ceft[/tags]

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