Eric Schmidt "Welcome to Epic Journey in Computing. Welcome to Chrome OS"

Eric Schmidt, "With hindsight, why has this been so hard? After all, we had all the IT stuff. And then the web was invented. But the web isn't really cloud computing--it's an enormously important source of information, probably the most important ever invented. One major web innovation cycle happened in 1995--remember the Netscape IPO, Java […]

Eric Schmidt, "With hindsight, why has this been so hard? After all, we had all the IT stuff. And then the web was invented. But the web isn't really cloud computing--it's an enormously important source of information, probably the most important ever invented. One major web innovation cycle happened in 1995--remember the Netscape IPO, Java and all of that--ultimately leading, in 1997, to an announcement by Oracle (and bunch of other people including myself) called "the network computer." It was exactly what the Chrome team at Google was talking about on Tuesday. Go back and read the language. Use your favorite search engine and look at what I said," said in his talk during the release of Chrome OS.

[…]Chrome and Chrome OS are possible today for several reasons. First, time. Moore's law is a factor of 1,000 in 15 years--so 15 years ago versus today, we've 1,000 times faster networks, CPUs and screens. That's a lot more horsepower at the networking and disk level, which means the disks are faster, and the network is more reliable. Then, technology. Asynchronous JavaScript XML, or AJAX, came along in in 2003/04, and it enabled the first really interesting web apps like Gmail to be built. All of a sudden people were like "Wow! This web thing is actually kind of useful ... I can write some pretty interesting applications and they can update themselves!" And then a more general technology now known as LAMP, which stands for Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP--and Perl, Python and various other Ps--evolved as a platform for the back-end.

So all of a sudden you had a client combined with a back-end that were powerful enough to sustain a new programming model. Instead of building these large monolithic programs, people would take snippets of code and aggregate them together in languages like Java and JavaScript."

Here're Chorme OS Event videos:

Chrome Event:

Chrome Browser -- Part 1

Chrome Web Store -- Part 2:

Chrome OS -- Part 3:

Eric's Speech & Closing -- Part 4:

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