Viacom Set to Appeal Its Lost YouTube Lawsuit Case

Viacom says a new wave of digital piracy could threaten the U.S. media business unless federal courts overturn its defeat in a copyright-infringement lawsuit against Google's YouTube video-sharing site.Some intellectual-property lawyers say Viacom's appeal could focus in part on how specifically aware of copyright violations YouTube must have been to be denied protection under the […]

Viacom says a new wave of digital piracy could threaten the U.S. media business unless federal courts overturn its defeat in a copyright-infringement lawsuit against Google's YouTube video-sharing site.

Some intellectual-property lawyers say Viacom's appeal could focus in part on how specifically aware of copyright violations YouTube must have been to be denied protection under the 1998 law.

In the June decision, the judge said that a jury could find YouTube "welcomed" copyright infringing material, but that "general" awareness of infringement wasn't the same as specific knowledge, and that YouTube removed videos when asked.

A Google spokeswoman said in a statement:

"We regret that Viacom continues to drag out this case. The court here, like every other court to have considered the issue, correctly ruled that the law protects online services like YouTube, which remove content when notified by the copyright holder that it is unauthorized. We will strongly defend the court's decision on appeal." She declined to comment further.

Yesterday, Google announced changes to its "copyright rules," saying that over the next several months it'll be able to respond to requests to take down copyrighted material on YouTube and other Google sites in 24 hours or less.

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