Microsoft Flips Back on Kinect Hacking, Says Kinect Interface Was Left Unprotected 'By Design '

Microsoft today changed its stand about the open-source community finding new uses for its Kinect device, a Microsoft representatives in a National Public Radio's "Science Friday" said that the company's Kinect motion-controller was left open by "design," tweeted a "Science Friday" staff:Kipman argued that ''hacking'' was the wrong term:''Kinect wasn't actually hacked. Hacking would mean […]

Microsoft today changed its stand about the open-source community finding new uses for its Kinect device, a Microsoft representatives in a National Public Radio's "Science Friday" said that the company's Kinect motion-controller was left open by "design," tweeted a "Science Friday" staff:

Kipman argued that ''hacking'' was the wrong term:

''Kinect wasn't actually hacked. Hacking would mean that someone got to our algorithms that sit on the side of the Xbox and was able to actually use them. Which hasn't happened. Or it means that you put a device between the sensor and the Xbox for means of cheating, which also hasn't happened. What has happened is someone wrote a open-source driver for PCs, which essentially opens the USB connection, which we didn't protect, by design, and reads the inputs from the sensor.''

Here's the full interview:

Now, Adafruit who came up with a $3,000 challenge to hack Kinect, feeling vindicated, "In about one week we turned [Microsoft's contention that it would stop hacking of the Kinect by working] 'closely with law enforcement' to 'inspired' by community finding new uses for Kinect," Adafruit wrote.

[Source]