Google AdWords Product Listing Ads Now Available to All U.S. Advertisers

On Nov'11,09, Google launched the beta of "Product Listing Ads," a way for advertisers to give Google a feed of products, have images of those products appear in the ads, and to pay on a cost-per-acquisition basis. Today, Google announced that Product Listing Ads will now be offered to all U.S. advertisers over the coming […]

On Nov'11,09, Google launched the beta of "Product Listing Ads," a way for advertisers to give Google a feed of products, have images of those products appear in the ads, and to pay on a cost-per-acquisition basis. Today, Google announced that Product Listing Ads will now be offered to all U.S. advertisers over the coming week.

"Product Listing Ads, along with Product Extensions, is part of AdWords Product Ads. With Product Ads, users can see exact products you offer before they even reach your site, which leads to more clicks, higher quality leads, and higher ROI for your search ads.

Like Product Extensions, which lets you add pictures and prices of relevant products to your keyword-targeted text ads, Product Listing Ads makes it easy to show most relevant products from your Google Merchant Center account to potential customers searching on Google.com.

 product listing ads

However, unlike Product Extensions, Product Listing Ads don't require any keywords or ad text. Product Listing Ads are automatically triggered whenever someone's search matches an item in your Merchant Center account, making it easy to show relevant ads for your entire product inventory," explains Google.

Some highlights:

  • designed to be purchased on a CPA basis, where you pay only when a product is actually sold. However, CPC (cost-per-click pricing) is allowed.
  • designed for merchants to put in a product feed, and Google'll automatically use that to trigger the ads against keywords it determines.
  • One CPA price for all products can be given, or advertisers can set different CPA pricing for different products.
  • Advertisers can pay on a percentage basis (IE, Google might get, say, 5% of a sale -- or 2% -- or 20%, whatever you set) or set cost basis (Google might get $2 per sale, $5 per sale, $20 per sale, etc).

More Info: Help Center

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