U.S. Supreme Court to Hear Argument on Links Between Violent Video Games and Anti-Social Behavior

A California law that prevents the sale of violent video games to minors may end up being struck down in the US Supreme Court as justices appeared to question its constitutionality. The U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments on whether states should be allowed to prohibit the sale of violent video games to children.At issue […]

A California law that prevents the sale of violent video games to minors may end up being struck down in the US Supreme Court as justices appeared to question its constitutionality. The U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments on whether states should be allowed to prohibit the sale of violent video games to children.

At issue is a pending California law that provides for up to a $1,000 fine to retailers who sell violent video games; defined as depicting "killing, maiming dismembering, or sexually assaulting an image of a human being" to children. The fine doesn't apply to sales clerks if they've no ownership interest in the business.

Lawyers for Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger argued in court papers that the California legislature, in passing the law, considered numerous studies that established a link between playing the violent games with an increase in aggressive thoughts, anti-social behavior and desensitization to violence in both minors and adults.

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