Windows 7 and Office 2010 Offer Enhanced Accessibility Options

Windows 7 and Office 2010 were designed with people of all abilities in mind, including computer users with low vision or limited dexterity due to arthritis, temporary impairments caused by injuries such as a broken arm, or environmental conditions such as extreme glare on a sunny day. Built-in accessibility options and programs include improved speech […]

Windows 7 and Office 2010 were designed with people of all abilities in mind, including computer users with low vision or limited dexterity due to arthritis, temporary impairments caused by injuries such as a broken arm, or environmental conditions such as extreme glare on a sunny day. Built-in accessibility options and programs include improved speech recognition, an enhanced on-screen keyboard, a mini-translator, and new multitouch functionality that allows people to control their computers using simple hand gestures.

The accessibility settings in Win7 and Office 2010 -- and features such as zoom buttons on keyboards and mice and in Internet Explorer -- are designed to make it easier and more comfortable for people to personalize their PCs and achieve greater convenience and productivity. While some of these features are not well known, people who use them find them very valuable. Better yet, these built-in accessibility features and options are available at no extra charge.

[Source: 1, 2]