Microsoft Gave a Glimpse of "Large Stereoscopic 3D Display" at Duke University and MIT Campus

Microsoft's Craig Mundie visited Duke University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) this week to show off forthcoming NUIs (natural user interfaces), involving "a large stereoscopic 3D goggles that showed some of the possibilities of human-scale computer interaction," and company's soon-to-be-released Kinect controller.He provided demonstrations that showed "what it might be like to interact with […]

Microsoft's Craig Mundie visited Duke University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) this week to show off forthcoming NUIs (natural user interfaces), involving "a large stereoscopic 3D goggles that showed some of the possibilities of human-scale computer interaction," and company's soon-to-be-released Kinect controller.

He provided demonstrations that showed "what it might be like to interact with a computer ... the size of a room," the company says. Craig was able to "walk into a 3D world where he could shop and play games, interacting with people in both physical and virtual environment in a very natural way."

Reporting on MIT event, Deborah Chen, a staff writer for MIT's writes, "With a few expert waves of his hand, Mundie opened a virtual room containing the contents of his aunt's wish list. He selected a pasta maker, then zoomed in and rotated the image."

Mundie was able to expand the pasta maker image by widening his arms, making hundreds of internal parts visible. He was also able to place the item in a box for purchase, Chen adds.

Another demonstration is said to have involved a "Player Participation TV Series," in which 3D avatars were able to change the course of a story in real time.

[Source]