'Competition Is One Click Away,' Google Exec Said In A 'Is Google a Monopolist?' Debate

The Wall Street Journal ran "a debate" about fairness in search today. In it, Google fellow and engineer Amit Singhal discussed how search has evolved to meet users needs. Amit argues the competition is one click away. Charles Rule, an attorney whose firm represents corporations suing Google, counters that the company commands a share of […]

The Wall Street Journal ran "a debate" about fairness in search today. In it, Google fellow and engineer Amit Singhal discussed how search has evolved to meet users needs. Amit argues the competition is one click away. Charles Rule, an attorney whose firm represents corporations suing Google, counters that the company commands a share of search advertising in excess of 70%—the threshold for monopoly under the Sherman Act.

Amit's oped: "Last week, "Googling something" took on a whole new meaning. Instead of typing your question into the search box and hitting Enter, our newest invention—Google Instant—shows constantly evolving results based on the individual letters you type.

Instant is just the latest in a long line of search improvements. Five years ago, search results were just "ten blue links"—simple web pages with some text. Today search engines provide answers in the form of images, books, news, music, maps and even "real time" results from sites such as Twitter."

More Info: Competition in an Instant