HDCP 'master key' Leaked, Left Open HDTV Copy Protection

On Monday, the high definition content protection (HDCP) was cracked and the supposed "master key" has begun to make its way around the Web. With this "master key," the system no longer works, as hackers would now be able to create their own source and sink keys, both of which're needed to playback content on […]

On Monday, the high definition content protection (HDCP) was cracked and the supposed "master key" has begun to make its way around the Web. With this "master key," the system no longer works, as hackers would now be able to create their own source and sink keys, both of which're needed to playback content on HDCP-protected devices. Thus a perfect connection could always be ensured between transmitting and receiving devices.

The key is described as "a forty times forty element matrix of fifty-six bit hexadecimal numbers".

Currently, most purchased HD content requires HDCP DRM-technology on both ends of a user's setup, such as a Blu-ray player and an HDTV, or it won't play. It would now make HDCP-protected content copyable. While the system does have a method for revocation, with master key, hacker would be able to create a new active key, and build devices that could decode and copy content at its full quality.