Intel R&D sheds light on future technology at IDF 2010 Wolfenstein Ray Traced

Intel at Intel Developer Conference (IDF) showed a few of its current R&D projects:Object-Aware Situated Interactive System - or OASIS in acronym form. It uses a combination of a 3D camera, projector, and sophisticated software algorithms to create a touch-sensitive environment on everyday household surfaces. The software enable the camera to scan immediate area and […]

Intel at Intel Developer Conference (IDF) showed a few of its current R&D projects:

  • Object-Aware Situated Interactive System - or OASIS in acronym form. It uses a combination of a 3D camera, projector, and sophisticated software algorithms to create a touch-sensitive environment on everyday household surfaces. The software enable the camera to scan immediate area and tracks movements, which're represented on ordinary surface via a projector, while the laptop displays a computerised version of environment.

  • Cloud-based Ray Tracing for Games: Intel demonstrated a new project called "Wolfenstein*: Ray Traced". The visual content of the demo. The up-to-date Wolfenstein game is rendered through a real-time ray tracer with several special effects that haven't been possible before in games with such an accuracy.

    In-vehicle context awareness: Inside the car, it uses facial recognition to see how many people are in the car, and it knows if you're watching road (or your friend next to you). The computer can also "sense" vehicles around and other things like that, thanks to external sensors or radars.

  • Smart computing Islands on everyday surfaces: Based on analysis of both color and depth images, a computer is capable of recognizing (select) objects on a surface and also track a finger that act as a pointer for user interface that's projected onto the surface. Once an object has been recognized, it's possible to create a number of apps, the obvious ones are educational, but this would open the door to many more things.
  • Fast and low-power facial recognition: The goal is to be able to recognize individuals fairly quickly and have an idea of what they're doing. The program currently runs on an Atom processor, but the computation can also be offloaded to a cloud if there are a lot of subjects to track.