Google founders were differed over "Interest-based Ads," revealed Google's 2008 confidential document, WSJ says

Wall Street Journal got hold of a seven-page confidential Google's "vision statement" or "brainstorming document" document from 2008 about interest-based advertising that was released in Mar'09. In addition of providing ads that match the content of a page, the service, currently available only to a limited group of advertisers, uses cookies to track any time […]

Wall Street Journal got hold of a seven-page confidential Google's "vision statement" or "brainstorming document" document from 2008 about interest-based advertising that was released in Mar'09. In addition of providing ads that match the content of a page, the service, currently available only to a limited group of advertisers, uses cookies to track any time a user visits one of the more than one million sites where Google sells display ads.

WSJ says that Google's executives were against using cookies to track people online, but the DoubleClick acquisition changed their perspective.

"For the first time, Google had the ability to deliver ads targeted to individual people's computers. But just because it had the ability, Google didn't start using it. There was still too much internal resistance. [...] Tensions erupted during a meeting with about a dozen executives at Google's Mountain View, Calif., headquarters about 18 months ago when Messrs. Page and Brin shouted at each other over how aggressively Google should move into targeting, according to a person who had knowledge of the meeting.[…]Mr. Brin was more reluctant than Mr. Page, this person said. Eventually, he acquiesced and plans for Google to sell ads targeted to people's interests went ahead.

More Info: Google: Into the Future

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