RIM: No "Back door exists" wouldn't provide access to "Key or Data" to any unauthorized party or Government

Research in Motion said that "it'll not provide a backdoor into its encrypted messages for the purposes of local government surveillance, despite the demands of certain countries. "The system is viewed as a security risk in India, United Arab Emirates and the kingdom of Saudi Arabia."The Indian Ministry of Telecommunications' demands for an unencrypted e-mail […]

Research in Motion said that "it'll not provide a backdoor into its encrypted messages for the purposes of local government surveillance, despite the demands of certain countries. "The system is viewed as a security risk in India, United Arab Emirates and the kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

"The Indian Ministry of Telecommunications' demands for an unencrypted e-mail messaging system. The Ministry expressed concern that BlackBerry messaging system could serve as a method of communication for dissidents who want to be untraceable."

And, now, the "UAE's Telecommunications Regulatory Authority said it would suspend BlackBerry Messenger, email and Web browsing services beginning on October 11th if RIM doesn't provide a solution for local messaging control. State-run operator Saudi Telecom followed by banning BlackBerry Messenger."

RIM issued an statment: "The BlackBerry security architecture for enterprise customers is based on a symmetric key system whereby customer creates their own key and only customer ever possesses a copy of their encryption key. RIM doesn't possess a 'master key', nor does any 'back door' exist in the system that would allow RIM or any 3rd-party to gain unauthorized access to the key or corporate data."


Full Statement: RIM Press Statement

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