Microsoft quashed its plan to have "InPrivate Browsing" enable by default, WSJ

WSJ reports that "that by visiting 50 of the most popular websites in US, they found an average of "64 pieces of tracking technology" would be installed onto a user's machine – by each site. The article about Microsoft's Internet Explorer, notes that Microsoft manages advertising on four of these sites.According to WSJ, "Microsoft product […]

WSJ reports that "that by visiting 50 of the most popular websites in US, they found an average of "64 pieces of tracking technology" would be installed onto a user's machine – by each site. The article about Microsoft's Internet Explorer, notes that Microsoft manages advertising on four of these sites.

According to WSJ, "Microsoft product planners had "originally wanted IE to have default privacy settings" that were "industry-leading", but instead opted to have these settings disabled by default. This decision was believed to be the result of Microsoft's fears around the potential of IE8 would reduce advertising revenue, although Microsoft claims that privacy vs. revenue issues were balanced out in product development process. Whilst advertisers agree with Microsoft's choices in development of IE8, privacy groups say that with users not being prompted about "InPrivate Browsing" and with no option to turn that browsing mode on by default, the end result is a "disappointment"."

IE8 has been well received by the public, increasing it's market-share in recent months.

[Source]