Todays' Cyber attacks are worse than "Love Bug" virus, Symantec reports

A decade after the “Love Bug” virus attacked millions of computers worldwide and put the Philippines in the IT world map in a negative way, security experts noted today’s computer attacks are more malicious than the original computer security threat. "On 4 May, 2000, 1 in 28 e-mails contained the Love Bug virus. By comparison, […]

A decade after the “Love Bug” virus attacked millions of computers worldwide and put the Philippines in the IT world map in a negative way, security experts noted today’s computer attacks are more malicious than the original computer security threat. "On 4 May, 2000, 1 in 28 e-mails contained the Love Bug virus. By comparison, 1 in 287.2 e-mails contained a virus on 9 April 2010, the peak for April. In April 2010 overall, MessageLabs Intelligence intercepted 36,208 unique strains of malware." "The Love Bug was operating in the wake of the Melissa virus, a similarly destructive worm from the previous year," said MessageLabs’ Paul Wood. The April 2010 MessageLabs Intelligence Report also revealed that Rustock has surpassed Cutwail as the biggest botnet both in terms of the amount of spam it sends and the amount of active bots under its control. Worldwide, the spam rate this month was pegged at 89.9%, a drop of 0.8% from the previous month. In the region, Malaysia and Singapore also saw a drop in the spam rate to 87.7%, and 87.6% respectively, the report added.

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