Hyper-V device driver code (Integration Services) for Linux

The Hyper-V device driver code (Integration Services) for Linux gives Linux VMs significantly improved storage and networking performance. While not all of the capabilities of the new 2.1 version of Integration Services have made it into supported, commercial Linux distributions (SUSE and Red Hat), there’s great sustained progress. Taking a snapshot of a Linux virtual […]

The Hyper-V device driver code (Integration Services) for Linux gives Linux VMs significantly improved storage and networking performance. While not all of the capabilities of the new 2.1 version of Integration Services have made it into supported, commercial Linux distributions (SUSE and Red Hat), there’s great sustained progress. Taking a snapshot of a Linux virtual machine works great on Hyper-V, but unlike snapshotting a properly configured Windows VM, the Linux instance is briefly “frozen” (like a TV dinner) while its memory contents are saved to disk. When the Linux VM “thaws” the clock in VM isn’t aware of the seconds that ticked away while it was in a trance, and it’s clock may be out of sync. Before version 2.1 of the Integration Services, time synchronization might have required correction via NTP, but the new release includes (among other awesome things) code to synchronize the Linux VM clock to Hyper-V. Version 2.1 also includes Symmetric Multi-Processing (SMP) support for Linux VMs (for up to 4 virtual CPUs per virtual machine) as well as code to coordinate shutdown requests from Hyper-V. Continuing to enhance Windows Server, Hyper-V, and System Center to host, manage, and monitor virtual machines of all kinds is the goal,” explains John.

More info: Microsoft Connect site (download link) | Features Details

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