Microsoft showcases 'use of intelligence & crime forensics' to dismantle worlds' largest software counterfeiting ring in southern China at French Science and Industry Museum, Paris

New counterfeiting exhibition at French Science and Industry Museum in Paris showcases Microsoft’s use of intelligence and crime forensics to help dismantle the world’s largest software counterfeiting ring. “To fight software counterfeiting, Microsoft has set up nine regional crime labs around the world, staffed by forensic experts. They evaluate more than half-million pieces of evidence […]

New counterfeiting exhibition at French Science and Industry Museum in Paris showcases Microsoft’s use of intelligence and crime forensics to help dismantle the world’s largest software counterfeiting ring. “To fight software counterfeiting, Microsoft has set up nine regional crime labs around the world, staffed by forensic experts. They evaluate more than half-million pieces of evidence each year, much of it from our customers through piracy tips, formal complaints, and voluntary product submissions. Using innovative intelligence techniques & forensic technologies, our labs “connect the dots” among disparate pieces of evidence to uncover how computer users are being victimized, and by whom. Optical disc “fingerprinting,” for instance, allows us to match counterfeits found on different continents and trace them to known production facilities. We use this intelligence to support international law enforcement in shutting down highly organized criminal syndicates behind counterfeit software. A good example is the recent dismantling of the largest software counterfeiting syndicate in history, based in southern China and responsible for producing more than $2 billion worth of counterfeit software, including versions of 19 different Microsoft products in 11 languages, found in 36 countries,” posted David Finn.

Global collaboration between FBI, Chinese authorities and Microsoft led demise of worlds' largest known counterfeiting syndicate:

More info: Using Intelligence and Forensics to Protect Against Counterfeit Software | Unraveling Software Piracy