Steve Jobs' response on Section 3.3.1 of iPhone SDK terms

Apple's ban on “non-native” applications for iPhone created a big uproar “meaning every app has to be “originally written” in C, C++ or Objective C, and tools like Adobe's upcoming CS5 Flash-to-iPhone converter are banned” – developers have been seeking response from Apple. Greg Slepak got a response from Steve Jobs – Greg told Steve […]

Apple's ban on “non-native” applications for iPhone created a big uproar “meaning every app has to be “originally written” in C, C++ or Objective C, and tools like Adobe's upcoming CS5 Flash-to-iPhone converter are banned” – developers have been seeking response from Apple. Greg Slepak got a response from Steve Jobs – Greg told Steve that "Lots of people are pissed off ... your SDK TOS are growing [on Apple's products] like an invisible cancer," and said that even John Gruber, a biigest fan of Apple, was questioning the decision. Jobs responded by linking a recent Gruber article calling the new SDK terms of service a smart business move for Apple. Gruber's article argues that Apple has no incentive to give other companies any say over what goes into the App Store, and says that iPhone developers would be smart to follow Apple's advice, rather than Microsoft's or Adobe's. Jobs called the article "insightful." Greg responded by saying "Gruber is wrong," and that cross-platform frameworks have plenty to offer Apple. Jobs responded: "We've been there before, and intermediate layers between the platform and the developer ultimately produces sub-standard apps and hinders the progress of the platform."

[Source]