Google backs TheorARM "free optimised ARM version of Theora video codec"

The battle for HTML5 video element support is already arriving in Firefox, Opera, Chrome, and Safari, and it has got even more interesting, with Google officially praising the "patent-free, royalty-free" Theora codec, and endorsing it for mobile use in particular. Google has helped fund an “ARM code (TheorARM)” a free optimised ARM version of Theora […]

The battle for HTML5 video element support is already arriving in Firefox, Opera, Chrome, and Safari, and it has got even more interesting, with Google officially praising the "patent-free, royalty-free" Theora codec, and endorsing it for mobile use in particular. Google has helped fund an “ARM code (TheorARM)” a free optimised ARM version of Theora video codec. Theora is locked in a battle with H.264, which you may recognize as Apple's preferred codec for use with the HTML5 video tag. Google has just backed Theorarm, an OGG Theora/OGG Vorbis decoding library built for the ARM processors that run Google's Android devices.”Video decode is a pretty CPU intensive task. In order to fulfill the dream of being able to work on every device some painstaking effort is required. The complexity of Theora is considerably less than that of many of its peers; other codecs often require dedicated hardware in devices to help achieve performance targets, but with careful coding Theora can be made to run without this. In fact, on desktop/laptops realtime decode can be managed by an embedded Java player (such as the excellent free Cortado), enabling video playback on browsers still waiting to have video tag support added,” notes Google.

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