Cloud Computing and its Contribution to Climate Change

Greenpeace, issued a report on its predicted environmental effects of the growth of cloud computing. Using data from Gartner, Climate Group and Global e-Sustainability Initiative reports, Greenpeace estimated that global emissions from cloud computing will increase by two-thirds from 2007 to 2020. Greenpeace pointed a finger at Microsoft, Google, Yahoo and Apple for their data […]

Greenpeace, issued a report on its predicted environmental effects of the growth of cloud computing. Using data from Gartner, Climate Group and Global e-Sustainability Initiative reports, Greenpeace estimated that global emissions from cloud computing will increase by two-thirds from 2007 to 2020. Greenpeace pointed a finger at Microsoft, Google, Yahoo and Apple for their data centers' partial use of "dirty energy." The environmentalist group said that at Microsoft's new Chicago data center, 72.8% of power was generated by coal and 22.3% was nuclear. And 37.1% of power used at Microsoft's San Antonio data center was generated by coal, Greenpeace said. Microsoft's Francois Ajenstat issued a statement in response to Greenpeace report (embedded below): “Microsoft is committed to maximizing energy efficiency and to innovating in support of environmental sustainability. For e.g., our Quincy, Wash., data center was designed to reduce its carbon footprint by using available hydropower as its primary source of energy and in Dublin, Ireland, we use naturally cool outside air to cool data center, helping to improve efficiency by approximately 50%. A Microsoft spokesperson also referred to a document that outlines company's "best practices for environmentally sustainable data centers," available as a PDF.”


BeyondTrust 2009 Microsoft Vulnerability Analysis -

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