Bad DNS information brings users in Chile, US under Great Firewall of China

A networking glitch caused computers in Chile and the US to come under the control of the Great Firewall of China; The issue was reported by Mauricio Ereche, a DNS admin with NIC Chile, who found a local ISP reported that DNS queries for sites such as Facebook.com, Twitter.com and YouTube.com -- all of which've […]

A networking glitch caused computers in Chile and the US to come under the control of the Great Firewall of China; The issue was reported by Mauricio Ereche, a DNS admin with NIC Chile, who found a local ISP reported that DNS queries for sites such as Facebook.com, Twitter.com and YouTube.com -- all of which've been blocked in China -- were being redirected to bogus addresses. Ereche reported getting bogus information from three network access points in Chile, and one in California, but on Thursday he said "The traces show us that we're not hitting server in China," he wrote in a discussion group post. This issue occurred because, at least one outside ISP directed DNS requests to a root server based in China. This’s something that service providers outside of China shouldn’t do because it allows China's censored network to "leak" outside. Researchers've long known that China has changed DNS routing info to redirect users of censored services to government-run servers instead of sites such as Facebook and Twitter. But this’s the first public disclosure that those routes've leaked outside of China, according to Rodney Joffe of Neustar. "All of a sudden, the consequences’re that people outside China may be subverted or redirected to servers inside China," he said.

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