WorldWide Telescope (WWT) Bing Maps Application provide 'Real time info how space is moving over Earth'

Last week Microsoft rolled out embed code to put Twitter maps on any website; now the team released a new Microsoft Research’s WorldWide Telescope application to map out the stars, planets, solar systems and anything not on the Earth. WWT application allows you to view most of the features available in the Silverlight client right […]

Last week Microsoft rolled out embed code to put Twitter maps on any website; now the team released a new Microsoft Research’s WorldWide Telescope application to map out the stars, planets, solar systems and anything not on the Earth. WWT application allows you to view most of the features available in the Silverlight client right in Bing Maps. “Yes, WWT provides real time information about how space is moving over Earth. This provides context for where celestial entities are in real time if you were to look up at night sky. Upon launching WWT Bing Maps App, you may get so excited and just want to see SOMETHING, so just jump right in with stars. You can click “Start Here” button which enables a telescope mouse pointer which you drag somewhere onto map. Once you drop it on map the map will fade to constellations and stars overhead. You can navigate the universe same way you do Bing Maps by grabbing an area and dragging the map around (now a universe map),” explains Chris Pendleton. Head over to WWT app and click the Map App button in bottom left. Then click WWT icon like the one above right and then follow the instructions.

Watch the video below to see how the integration works with the WorldWide Telescope in minute seven:

[Source]