Apple v. HTC: 'smartphone market is still in nascent state'

Over past two weeks, I have followed with interest the coverage of Apple’s suit against HTC. “Reactions to the suit run the gamut from those who defend Apple’s taking steps to protect its IP to those who claim that Apple’s suit will impede further development in smartphone market. I don’t agree with latter viewpoint. There’s […]

Over past two weeks, I have followed with interest the coverage of Apple’s suit against HTC. “Reactions to the suit run the gamut from those who defend Apple’s taking steps to protect its IP to those who claim that Apple’s suit will impede further development in smartphone market. I don’t agree with latter viewpoint. There’s a long history of IP litigation in mobile phone market, and innovation has continued apace. NYT noted, “Nearly every large mobile phone player . . . has recently been involved in some sort of patent litigation involving mobile technologies.” Whether it’s Nokia v. Apple, RIM v. Motorola, or now Apple v. HTC, companies active in smartphone space are taking steps to protect their inventions. Smartphone market is still in a nascent state; much innovation still lies ahead in this field. In all nascent technology markets, there’s a period early where IP rights will be sorted out. This’s particularly true in smartphones, in which a number of different techs previously offered on a standalone basis now converge into a single device. Indeed, smartphones are a product of ‘open innovation’ paradigm – device manufacturers don’t do all of their development in-house, but add their own innovations to those of others to create a product that users want. Open innovation is only possible through licensing of third party IP rights, which ensures that those who develop building blocks that make a new technology possible are properly compensated for their investments in research and development,” says Horacio Gutierrez.

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